The Legendary Starfy/Regional differences

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During the localization process of The Legendary Starfy, various changes were made to the game so that it would appeal to players from the United States and Australia.

This article covers regional differences in the game. For other differences relating to the game's distribution, including box and manual, see here.

Title change

This game was originally released as Densetsu no Stafy Daīru Kaizokudan (Japanese: 伝説のスタフィー たいけつ!ダイール海賊団), literally Legendary Starfy Daīru Pirate Squad (or ostensibly Dire Pirate Squad) in Japan.[1] Daīru Pirate Squad refers to the group of space pirates lead by Mashtooth, including The Terrible Trio and Swabbies.

The game was released outside of Japan simply as The Legendary Starfy, presumably because it is the first game in the series to have been released outside of Japan, so the rest of the title wouldn't have been needed to differentiate it from the other four games.

Journal 'unlocked' mark

In the Japanese version, unlocked entries in the Journal (known as 'Events' in this version) are marked with a red marujishi ('◯ mark') instead of a green tick. A tick actually has an different meaning to the Japanese, meaning 'incorrect'.

Stuff differences

This section describes differences in the Stuff between the Japanese and English versions.

See also The Legendary Starfy/Stuff for a list of Stuff in the game.

Changed Japanese names

When the game was translated from Japanese to English, most of the names of the Stuff did not receive literal translations. The table below describes a number of notable changes.

Clothes

Number Name Japanese Name Comments
2 Guard Uniform ヘイシのふく,
(Soldier Clothes)
The original Japanese name refers to a soldier, not a guard; likely because Pufftop Guards are known as テンカイヘイシ, Tenkai Soldiers in Japan.
4 Splattered Clothes よごれたふく,
(Dirty Clothes)
The Japanese name is less specific than the English version, simply referring to clothes that are dirty.
5 Doctor's Clothes おいしゃさん,
(Doctor-san)
The Japanese name does not refer to anything Starfy or Starly are wearing, and is simply 'Doctor' followed by the Japanese honorific san.
6 Shell Costume かいがらサンド,
(Sand Shell)
The Japanese name may imply Starfy or Starly is actually wearing a sea-shell.
9 Viking Armor ヨロイ,
(Armor)
The Japanese name simply refers to Armor. Unlike the localisations, there is nothing in the Japanese name that refers to vikings.
10 High-Class Attire ヨーロピアンドレス,
(European Dress)
The Japanese name refers to a European dress, while the localisations presumably refer to the upper class.
12 Mashtooth Costume ダイールのふく,
(Daīru Clothes)
The Japanese name refers to 'Daīru', the Japanese name of Mashtooth.
13 Back-to-School Clothes しんぴんのふく,
(New Clothes)
The Japanese name simply refers to the clothes as being new.
14 Kitty Costume ネコスーツ,
(Cat Suit)
The Japanese name is less specific and refers to the costume as a 'neko suit'.
In the Japanese language, 'neko' may refer to both a cat or a kitten
15 Galactic Hero's Suit ヒーロースーツ,
(Hero Suit)
The Japanese name is less specific and only refers to a hero who is not specified as a hero of the galaxy.
16 Red Velvet Robe あかいふく,
(Red Clothes)
The Japanese name simply refers to red clothes. It does not specify that it is a robe or is made of velvet.
17 Ribbit-Wear Bathrobe カッパ,
(Kappa)
The original Japanese name was changed entirely to specify a frog-like bathrobe.
The original name simply refers to a kappa; a type of water-sprite from Japanese folklore.
18 Rubber-Ducky Ring おまる
(Potty)
The original Japanese name was changed entirely to specify a rubber-ducky ring.
The original name simply refers to a 'potty'; a child's toilet.

Extras

Number Name Japanese Name Comments
20 Guard's Spear ヘイシのヤリ,
(Soldier's Spear)
The original Japanese name refers to a soldier, not a guard; likely because Pufftop Guards are known as テンカイヘイシ, Tenkai Soldiers in Japan.
21 Cowboy Hat ウェスタンハット,
(Western Hat)
The original Japanese name refers to the western world, and does not specifically refer to cowboys.
22 Beret and Palette ベレーぼう,
(Beret)
The original Japanese name only refers to the Beret; the palette is not mentioned in the title.
23 Magic Top Hat マジシャンハット,
(Magician Hat)
The original Japanese name does not specify the hat as a top hat, and only implies it belongs to a magician.
24 Doctor's Accessory おいしゃさんセット,
(Doctor Set)
The original Japanese name implies there are multiple items.
This would only apply to Starly's version, as Starly has both a nurse's hat and a chart.
26 Pretty Makeup びじんメイク,
(Beauty Makeup)
The Japanese name refers to a bijin, '美人' - a person who is beautiful.
The localisations only specify the makeup as 'pretty'.
27 Viking Flair バイキングアイテム,
(Viking Item)
The Japanese name simply refers to an 'item', whereas the localisations suggest it is a stylish item.
28 Distinguished Wig キゾクなヅラ,
(Noble Wig)
The Japanese name may refer to someone who is noble, or the aristocracy.
29 Space Helmet フルフェイスメット,
(Full Face Helmet)
The Japanese name specifies that the helmet (shortened to 'met') covers the whole face.
30 Mashtooth Mask ダイールヘッド,
(Daīru Head)
The Japanese name refers to 'Daīru', the Japanese name of Mashtooth.
Additionally the extra is not specified as a mask. This may suggest Starfy or Starly are actually wearing Mashtooth's head.
31 Student Cap こどものぼうし,
(Kid's Hat)
The Japanese name refers to a 'kid', and does not imply they are a student.
32 Meow Helmet ネコメット,
(Cat Helmet)
The Japanese name refers to a 'neko', which may mean a cat or a kitten.
Helmet is shortened to 'met'.
33 Velvet Hat サンカクぼうし,
(Triangle Hat)
The Japanese name does not refer to the material of the hat.

Specials

Number Name Japanese Name Comments
38 Pufftop Guard テンカイヘイシ,
(Tenkai Soldier)
The Pufftop Guards are known as the Tenkai Soldiers in Japan. Tenkai is the Japanese name for Pufftop.
Pufftop is the kingdom in the sky in which Starfy and Starly reside.
40 Great Artist えかきさん,
(Artist-san)
The Japanese name refers to an 'Artist' followed by the Japanese honorific 'san'.
Its use may refer to a respectable artist.
42 Hospital Checkup モンシンモンシン,
(Inquiry, Inquiry)
The Japanese name is simply 'monshin, monshin', which can refer to a medial interview or hospital checkup.
43 Train Set スタでんてつ,
(Suta Railway)
The Japanese name probably incorporates 'Suta' as a shortened version of スタフィー, 'Sutafī' (Starfy)
45 Viking Invasion さんぞく,
(Bandit)
The Japanese name does not refer to an invasion.
46 Ballroom Dancer ダンシングワルツ,
(Waltz Dancing)
The Japanese name specifically refers to the waltz, a ballroom and folk dance of Austrian origin.
48 Mashtooth the Pirate かいぞくダイール,
(Pirate Daīru)
The Japanese name refers to 'Daīru', the Japanese name of Mashtooth.
49 School Days にゅーがくしき,
(School Entrance Ceremony)
The Japanese name refers to '入学式', meaning 'School Entrance Ceremony'.
50 Playful Kitty ネコタイム,
(Cat Time)
The Japanese name may imply a time to play with the cat.
51 Hero of the Galaxy でんせつのヒーロー,
(Legendary Hero)
The Japanese name refers to a legendary hero but does not imply he is a hero of the galaxy.
52 Festive Scene メリークリスマス,
(Merry Christmas)
The Japanese name refers to the festive greeting 'Merry Christmas'
53 Ribbit Costume ゲロゲーロ,
(Ribbit Ri~bbit)
The Japanese name is Gero Gēro; onomatopoeia for frog noises.

Regional differences

Various changes were made to the appearance of the Stuff between the localisations and the original Japanese version.

Doctor's Coat

In the Japanese version, the text on the badge is written in blue instead of black.

Spacesuit

In the Japanese version, the texts 'Hello!' (Starfy) and 'Love ya!' (Starly) are written with two exclamation marks instead of one.


Back-to-School Clothes

Back-to-School Clothes in the Japanese version

In the Japanese version, papers on Starfy and Starly's clothes omit a blue/orange section on the top of the paper and have kana written vertically. Starfy's version has the written kana 'ス' (Su), 'タ' (Ta) - the first two letters of 'スタフィー' (Starfy). Starly's version has the text 'ス', (Su) 'タ' (Ta) and the letter 'P', which phonetically sounds like Starly's Japanese name, 'Stapy'.

In the localisations, there is text on the blue/orange section of the paper which is difficult to read. Additionally, at the bottom of the paper there is text that says either 'Starfy' or 'Starly'.

Doctor's Accessory

In the Japanese version, the top of the paper on the clipboard on Starly's version says 'KARTE' instead of 'CHART'. This is probably a romaji rendering of 'chart' from the katakana 'カルテ' (karute).

Hospital Checkup

In the Japanese version, the syringe on Starly's version has a purple fluid in it. The fluid was removed completely in the localisations.

Space Voyage

In the Japanese version, the flag on Starly's version is red with a yellow star, which is the same as Vietnam's, this was changed to purple with a white star.

School Days

School Days in the Japanese version

In the Japanese version, the board next to Starfy or Starly spells the kana にゅーがくしき, meaning School Entrance Ceremony (入学式). The regional differences for the Back-to-School Clothes also apply (see here).

Playful Kitty

There is a regional difference that only applies to Starfy's version. In English games the word 'MEOW!' comes out of the cat. In Japanese games the equivalent onomatopoeia 'Gooo~' comes out of the cat, instead.

Manga-style cutscenes

The Japanese version's Story cutscenes appear on the screen from right-to-left in the style of manga. According to Miki Fujii, the original game was made 'with the Japanese manga culture in mind' but when The Legendary Starfy was brought to America, a number of changes were made to the Story cutscenes so that they read from left-to-right instead of right-to-left. [2]

Japanese onomatopoeia were either changed or removed in the localisations. For example in the 'The Adventure Begins' cartoon, きょろ (onomatopoeia for searching for someone with one's eyes) was replaced with 'shoop'.

Mermaid's voice

In the Japanese version, the Mermaid exclaims 'hi-hi', instead of 'hi'. The Mermaid previously exclaimed 'hi-hi' in Densetsu no Starfy 4, although the voice in Legendary Starfy Daīru Pirate Squiad is higher pitched than the one in Densetsu no Starfy 4.

Moe's voice

In the Japanese version, there are a number of situations where Moe will exclaim something. It is believed, without confirmation, to be '行くぜ' (ikuze), meaning 'let's go!" or "here we go!". This voice was removed in the localisations.

The situations include:

  • Moe jumping on the goal at the end of Stage 1-1 (Gluglug Lagoon).
  • Being shown Moe's advice after taking a second hit in the Paper-Cut Crusher Battle (Japanese: じゃんけんアタックバトル, Janken Attack Battle).
  • Moe's reaction after Starfy pushes The Moon into Mega Mashtoooth (Japanese: さいきょうダイール, Strongest Daīru).

Narrations

There are a number of narrations in the game that are exclusive to the Japanese versions.


Name of game

In the Japanese version, on the screen where 'Adventure' or 'Local Wireless' can be chosen, a Japanese voice can be heard shouting the name of the game; "Densetsu no Starfy Daīru Kaizokudan".

Jan-ken-pon

In the Japanese version, voices are used in the Rock, Paper Scissors game to reflect the common rules of Janken (Rock-Paper Scissors).

Nintendo

When the game is started up, the Nintendo logo is shown on the top screen, while Starfy and Starly are shown running up to each other to join their hands on the touch screen.

In the Japanese version, after Starfy and Starly touch their hands a female voice is heard shouting 'Nintendo!'. After beating the game there is a chance that a longer version of the same voice is heard.

Time notation

In the Japanese version, the times for Big Bossdown (Japanese: ボスオンパレード Boss on Parade) and the ??? stage are displayed in the notation (xx)'(yy)"(zz) instead of 'xx:yy:zz'.

References

  1. Nintendo Power magazine, Volume 244, Future Publishing, August 2009, pp. 73. Link: [1]
  2. Nintendo Life Nintendo/TOSE interview - The Legendary Starfy